Maple Granola

Quinoa Granola

 

Although Pumpkin Granola is the one we go through the fastest, here is another great one that doesn’t have migraine triggers.  We used to add Cranraisins to this recipe, but discovered that these are major migraine triggers for us; the granola is a great snack without them though.

Maple Granola

Quinoa Granola
3 cups old-fashioned oats
1/2 cup quinoa, uncooked
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 tsp. sea salt
1/4 cup coconut oil
1/2 cup maple syrup
2 tsp. vanilla

  1. Optional step:  The quinoa can be rinsed and toasted in a skillet to give it a “nuttier” flavor.  However, this is time consuming and not necessary in my opinion.
  2. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl.
  3. Add remaining ingredients and mix well.
  4. Place granola on a parchment-lined cookie sheet and bake at 350 degrees in 10 minute increments until dry (approximately 30 minutes depending on your oven).  After each 10 minute increment, stir the granola to keep the edges from burning.  Once the granola is almost dry, turn the oven off, prop the door slightly open, and allow the warmth to complete the drying process.
  5. Although we have never added hemp hearts to this recipe, we are experimenting with them and plan to try this at some point.

Protein Bars

Protein Bars

I’m having a great reduction in the frequency of my migraines since my diet changes, and I’m starting to add some of the foods back in.  The first I’m trying is almonds (but no other nuts).  I actually have seen conflicting information regarding almonds.  Nuts are considered migraine triggers, but almonds are sometimes recommended to migraine sufferers because of the magnesium in them.  I’m not having trouble eating them in moderate amounts, so I’m exploring recipes.  Here is one of my favorites.

I am overjoyed to be able to make protein bars like these.  Our other migraineur is still not able to eat any nuts, but she is able to eat Sunbutter.  So, we still make these for her, but just do the replacement.  Adding small amounts of almond butter into my diet has opened up many recipe options.  For me, it is totally worth giving up so many other foods so that I am able to reintroduce this migraine trigger without pain:)

The original inspiration for this recipe didn’t include any other migraine triggers, but we did make some changes that suit our family better.  As noted earlier, too much chia just doesn’t work well with my “insides”.  The addition of hemp hearts boosts the nutritional value as outlined here.  So, we worked with hemp hearts, chia, and flax to get a better combination for us.  Finally, we included the option of using Sunbutter in the same amount as almond butter to suit individual needs.

Now, we have a great travel option that can be stored at room temperature for short time periods, frozen, or refrigerated:)

Protein Bars

Protein Bars1/2 cup dry quinoa
2 Tbsp. chia seeds
1/4 cup hemp hearts
1/4 cup milled flax seeds
1 cup rolled oats
1/4 tsp. sea salt
1 tsp. cinnamon
1/2 cup raw almonds, coarsely chopped (about 50 almonds)
2 Tbsp. honey
1/4 cup brown rice syrup
1/2 cup almond butter (or Sunbutter)

  1. In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients.
  2. In a small, microwave-safe dish, combine honey, brown rice syrup, and almond butter (or Sunbutter).  Microwave for 20 seconds to soften.
  3. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to thoroughly mix.
  4. Transfer to a parchment lined 8 x 8 baking dish.  Press into an even layer with fingers.
  5. Bake at 350 degrees for 15 minutes.
  6. Allow to cool.
  7. Cut into 8 or 16 bars as desired.
  8. Cut parchment used for baking into pieces to wrap around each bar and refrigerate or freeze.

 

 

 

Zucchini Patties

Zucchini Quinoa Patties

It’s that time of year when zucchini is plentiful, and I have several recipes to share which will use it all.  This first one is a twist on a traditional recipe.  The twist is that quinoa is included to add a protein boost.  This recipe is best with fresh zucchini, but the others are great with fresh or frozen zucchini.  I will explain how I freeze it with the next zucchini post.

The original inspiration for these patties included several migraine triggers which I have removed/replaced.  We like these patties best when served as a side dish.

UPDATE:  When I posted this on Friday, I included the wrong amounts for the quinoa and water.  It is now correct.  I hope this didn’t create a problem for anyone trying the recipe!

Zucchini Patties

Zucchini Quinoa Patties

1/4c. quinoa, rinsed
1/2 c. water
1 1/2 c. grated zucchini
1/4 c. rice flour
1/4 t. baking powder
1/4 t. salt
1 t. oregano
1/8 t. garlic powder
black pepper
2 to 4 Tbsp. coconut oil

  1. Cook quinoa in the water.
  2. Squeeze the zucchini to remove excess water.
  3. Stir all ingredients (except for the coconut oil) together in a bowl.
  4. Mold a spoonful of mix into a ball and flatten into a patty.
  5. Fry in a skillet with heated coconut oil until each side is browned.  I use 1 to 2 Tbsp. oil at a time and add as necessary.
  6. Serve warm.

Quinoa Bread

Quinoa Bread Slices

Per my doctor’s recommendation, I eliminated wheat from my diet several years ago in an attempt to reduce my overall body pain.  This definitely helped, so I have not reintroduced wheat or other grains that include gluten.  However, I have missed bread.  Since I have more recently eliminated so many other foods, I have been looking for something to eat!

My daughter found this recipe which has given me a tasty bread option:)  We like it so much that we make it every day or two.  Obviously, we eat quite a bit of it.  In fact, because of the volume we eat, we have had to eliminate the chia from our recipe because it introduces….well….too much fiber.  Evidently, chia can absorb up to 27 times its volume in water – enough said.  The recipe is great with or without the chia though, so I have included it as an optional ingredient.  I use distilled white vinegar instead of the lemon juice to eliminate this migraine trigger.  There is no vinegar taste to the bread; the small amount of vinegar is necessary to activate the baking soda.

Quinoa Bread

The final change I have made is to bake the bread as 3 mini loaves rather than 1 full-size loaf.  Since this bread is rather dense, a full-sized loaf ends up being flat for us.  We prefer having small but square-ish pieces rather than long rectangular pieces.  This is just a matter of personal preference, so I have included baking times for each version.

We like this bread warm or toasted in a skillet.  Since the pieces are small, it is difficult, but possible, to toast them in a vertical toaster.

Links to some of the ingredients that we use are included, but please contact companies to confirm for yourself that they will meet your food allergy needs.

Quinoa Bread

Quinoa Bread Slices

1 3/4 cups quinoa, rinsed
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. distilled white vinegar
1/2 cup water (if needed for batter consistency)

  1. Place the quinoa in a bowl and cover with water and a lid.  Soak overnight in the refrigerator.
  2. In the morning, drain and rinse the quinoa.
  3. Place the quinoa, olive oil, sea salt, baking soda, and vinegar in a food processor and blend until a batter forms.  If you need to add water to get the batter to form, do so gradually up to 1/2 cup.  Due to the size of our food processor, we do this step in 1/2 batches and transfer to a bowl.
  4. Blend for an additional 3 minutes.
  5. Spoon into 3 small (or 1 large) loaf pans lined with parchment.
  6. Bake for 30 minutes (45 minutes for the large pan) at 350 degrees.
  7. Allow to cool for 30 minutes before slicing.
  8. We like this bread warm or toasted in a skillet.  Since the pieces are small, it is difficult, but possible, to toast them in a vertical toaster.